Andy Warhol

Down

Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was an American artist, and leading figure in the Pop Art movement starting in the 1960s.

 

Sally Castle


Sally is an incredible artist who creates beautiful linocuts of scenes around Reading and beyond.

Reading Streets
Reading Streets
Reading Streets
Reading Streets, Linocut print, Sally Castle
£85.00
Nothing's Lost
Nothing's Lost
Nothing's Lost
Nothing's Lost, reductive linocut print, Sally Castle
£210.00
Redlands
Redlands
Redlands
Redlands, Linocut Print, Sally Castle
£210.00
Caversham
Caversham
Caversham
Caversham, Linocut Print, Sally Castle
£150.00
Rub A Dub Dub Three Men In A Tub
Rub A Dub Dub Three Men In A Tub
Rub A Dub Dub Three Men In A Tub
Rub A Dub Dub Three Men In A Tub, Sally Castle, linocut print
£90.00
Shopping Alphabet
Shopping Alphabet
Shopping Alphabet
Shopping Alphabet, linocut print, Sally Castle.
£150.00
Serene Swans Swimming
Serene Swans Swimming
Serene Swans Swimming
Serene Swans Swimming, Linocut print, Sally Castle
£90.00
The Constitutionals
The Constitutionals
The Constitutionals
The Constitutionals, limited edition 2 of 20 linocut print, Sally Castle
£150.00
Thirteen Swans
Thirteen Swans
Thirteen Swans
Thirteen Swans, Linocut print, Sally Castle
£85.00

Selected Works

Please contact the gallery to learn more about the works and to buy online.

About Andy Warhol

From Campbells soup cans to his iconic hair, Andy Warhol was one of the most distinctive artists of his era. Warhol liked to use bright colours and silk screen printing techniques to mass-produce artworks in a 'factory' style production line.

The pineapple connection to Reading

A local historical delight, pineapples are of interest to our area of Berkshire.

According to the tale, King Charles II was given one of the first pineapples bought to the British Isles from Barbados. He ate the fruit, then gifted the spiky leafy top to Roger Palmer of Reading. Palmer planted the spiky top in his garden at Dorney Court.

Palmer’s was the first pineapple plant to be grown in England. The story goes that once the plant yielded fruit, Palmer gifted it back to King Charles, and the pineapple became the unofficial symbol of the Restoration period. Pineapple motifs and carvings are displayed to this day at Dorney Court, as a proud symbol of their heritage.